Publications

Books and Edited Volumes

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Slaves Waiting for Sale: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade

University of Chicago Press, 2011
Charles C. Eldredge Prize, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Library of Virginia Literary Award for non-fiction, 2012


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Shaping the Body Politic: Art and Political Formation in the Early Nation

Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2011.
co-edited volume with Louis P. Nelson.
Includes my essay, “Revisiting Cincinnatus: Houdon’s George Washington.”


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The Politics of Taste in Antebellum Charleston

Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005
Spiro Kostof Book Award, Society of Architectural Historians
George C. Rogers, Jr. Book Award, South Carolina Historical Society
Fred B. Kniffen Book Award, Association for the Preservation of Artifacts & Landscapes


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A Jeffersonian Ideal: Selections from the Dr. and Mrs. Henry C. Landon III Collection of Fine and Decorative Arts

Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Art Museum, 2005.
(Served as contributor and co-editor).


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In Pursuit of Refinement: Charlestonians Abroad 1740-1860

Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1999.
(Lead author and editor).
Mary Ellen LoPresti Book Award, Art Libraries Society of North America, Southeast Chapter


Articles in Peer Reviewed Journals, Edited Volumes, and Exhibition Catalogs

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” ‘To Strike Terror’: Equestrian Monuments and Southern Power,” The Civil War in Art and Memory edited by Kirk Savage (Center for the Advanced Study of the Visual Arts; Yale University Press), 2016.


“Mapping the Slave Trade in Richmond and New Orleans,” Buildings and Landscape 20.2 (Fall 2013): 102-125.


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“George Washington: Cincinnatus or Marcus Aurelius?” in Thomas Jefferson, The Classical World, and Early America, edited by Peter S. Onuf
Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2011.


 

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“Raphaelle Peale’s Still Life with Oranges: Status, Ritual, and the Illusion of Mastery,” in Material World in Anglo-America: Regional Identity and Urbanity in the Tidewater, Lowcountry, and Caribbean
Edited by Davis S. Shields
Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2009


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“The Most Famous Plantation of All: The Politics of Painting Mount Vernon,” in Landscape of Slavery: The Plantation in American Art.
Edited by Angela D. Mack and Stephen G. Hoffius.
Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2008.

                • Mary Ellen LoPresti Book Award, Art Libraries Society of North America, Southeast Chapter

“Little of Artistic Merit? The Problem and Promise of Southern Art History,” American Art 19.2 (Summer 2005): 11-18.


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“Conflating Past and Present in the Reconstruction of Charleston’s St. Philip’s Church,” in Constructing Image, Identity, and Place: Perspectives in Vernacular Architecture IX, Alison K. Hoagland and Kenneth A. Breisch, eds.
Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2003.

 


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“Our Ingenious Countryman Mr. Benbridge,” in Henry Benbridge: Charleston Portrait Painter. Charleston: Carolina Art Association, 2000.

 

 


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“Cultural Politics, Colonial Crisis, and Ancient Metaphor in John Singleton Copley’s Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Izard,”
Winterthur Portfolio 34.2/3 (1999): 85-108.


“ ‘An Idea of Grandeur’: Furnishing the Classical Interior in Charleston, 1815-1840,” Historical Archeology 33.3 (1999): 32-47.


“Beautiful Specimens, Elegant Patterns: New York Furniture for the Charleston Market, 1815-1840.” Co-authored with Robert Leath. American Furniture 4 (1996): 137-174.


“Allegorizing on Their Own Hooks: The Book Illustrations of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Arthur Hughes,” in Pocket Cathedrals: Pre-Raphaelite Book Illustration. Susan Casteras, ed. New Haven: Yale Center for British Art, 1991.


Other Publications

“Richmond Reoccupied by the Men Who Wore the Gray,” Slate Magazine, July 1, 2015, http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/history/2015/07/confederate_flag_it_s_not_a_symbol_of_southern_heritage_it_has_always_been.1.html.


“The First Attack on Charleston’s AME Church,” Slate Magazine, June 19, 2015, http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/04/03/how-the-slave-trade-built-america/.


“How the Slave Trade Built America,” New York Times, April 3, 2015, http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/04/03/how-the-slave-trade-built-america/.


“Eyre Crowe,” encyclopedia entry for Dictionary of American History, Supplement: American in the World, 1776 to the Present, Cengage Learning, forthcoming 2015.


“Eyre Crowe’s Images of the Slave Trade,” encyclopedia entry for Encyclopedia Virginia, http://encyclopediavirginia.org.


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“Tara, Gone with the Wind, and the Southern Landscape Tradition,” for American Material Culture and the Texas Experience: The David B. Warren Symposium, Volume 2. Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, 2011.


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“Slave Markets/Jails/Pens”
encyclopedia entry for World of a Slave
Greenwood Press, 2010.


Thomas Coram,” and “Henry Benbridge” encyclopedia entries for Grove Dictionary of American Art, Oxford University Press, 2011.


“American Art and Material Culture,” in What Should I Read Next? 70 University Professors Recommend Readings in History,


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“American Art and Material Culture,” in What Should I Read Next? 70 University Professors Recommend Readings in History, Politics, Literature, Math, Science, Technology, the Arts, and More, Jessica R. Feldman and Robert Stilling, eds. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2008.


“Transatlantic Currents: Paintings at MESDA,” The Magazine Antiques 171.1 (Jan. 2007): 176-83.


Review of Southern Furniture 1680-1830: The Colonial Williamsburg Collection, Ronald L. Hurst and Jonathan Prown. Winterthur Portfolio 33.1 (1999): 65-70.


Selected entries in The Vernacular Architecture of Charleston and the Lowcountry, 1670-1990. Carter Hudgins, et al. eds. Charleston: Historic Charleston Foundation, 1994.

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